Botanical Garden's follow up | Nature Campus

The travelling oak
The travelling oak which was transferred six months ago, has settled in nicely. Once again carried by a tractor, the oak was transplanted in a flowerbed constructed as part of the new entrance plaza. May it live long and prosper!

Ornamentals from the wild
The ornamental flowerbeds around the Garden office building are flowering. Ephemeral seeds of Israeli native plants are sown each year to demonstrate the possibilities of gardening with wild plants. The first to bloom are the blue lupine (Lupinus pilosus) and Cerinthe palaestina. We expect the blossom to continue till spring, with the appearance of the yellowish Lomelosia prolifera flowers, several Centaurea species and, at the end of this season, the beautiful purple peregrinating bellflower (Campanula peregrina), a hemicryptophyte with a tall inflorescence. 

Our vigorous volunteers have returned 
CAARI (Canadian-American Active Retirees in Israel) volunteers returned to work in the Garden, during the winter, for the fifth time! Eyar Cohen, a national service volunteer working in the garden, led this group while they were weeding invasive plants around the Garden. The results of their hard work are evident, especially in the plots already treated in previous years, where the concentration of invasive species has declined dramatically. We are grateful to them for their hard work and look forward to seeing them again next year.

The traveling oak, photo: Kineret Manevich

The traveling oak, photo: Kineret Manevich

CAARI volunteers working in the Garden, photo: Eyar Cohen

CAARI volunteers working in the Garden, photo: Eyar Cohen

winter flowers

1. Prolific Scabious (Lomelosia prolifera), photo: Yuval Sapir; 2. Centaurea crocodylium, Photo: Yael Orgad; 3. Blue Lupine (Lupinus pilosus), photo: Yuval Sapir; 4. Cerinthe palaestina, Photo: Yael Orgad

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