In the previous "Garden News" we wrote about the "Land of Wheat" project, in which we planted several traditional wheat varieties (land races) alongside modern cultural wheat.

At the beginning of May, harvest time, we collected seeds from six of the seven varieties. The differences between them were already clearly noticeable when collecting the seeds. The domesticated wheat, which is shorter than most of our other varieties, was first to ripen and most of the spikes were empty at the time of collection. It seems that the ants had been ahead of us.
Surprisingly, wild wheat (Triticum dicoccoides) and emmer (Triticum dicoccum), the oldest wheat varieties, were the most convenient to collect. The wheat had remained high and erect, and the spikelets, surprisingly, remain full of seeds. The spelt (Triticum spelta) wheat seeds ripened later and remained green. The Garden’s volunteers will clean the seeds and prepare them for sowing in the coming autumn.

Seed collection, “Land of Wheat” project, photo: Kineret Manevich

Seed collection, “Land of Wheat” project, photo: Kineret Manevich

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